CARRIE: “She is glorious as she conducts her symphony of destruction.”

Carrie Movie PosterChloe Grace Moretz as Carrie White
Julianne Moore as Margaret White
Judy Greer as Miss Desjardin
Portia Doubleday as Chris Hargensen
Gabriella Wilde as Sue Snell
Ansel Elgort as Tommy Ross
Alex Russell as Billy Nolan
IN THEATERS OCTOBER 18

Carrie White is an awkward, shy, and quiet girl who lives with her abusive, religious-fanatic mother. Carrie has no friends and is pretty much “invisible” to the rest of the student population of her high school unless she’s being made fun of or harassed. One day in the girls locker room, Carrie gets her period. Because her mother is a religious fanatic and everything is a sin, she has never prepared Carrie for womanhood. Carrie goes into hysterics. She thinks she’s bleeding to death. Frantically she screams and pleads to her classmates for help. The girls specifically resident “mean girl” and “ring leader” Chris Hargenson (Doubleday) begin to taunt Carrie by throwing tampons and sanitary pads at her while she flounders in terror on the floor of the shower. Chris even videos it on her phone. Carrie is totally distraught and humiliated before the gym teacher Miss Desjardin (Greer) stops them and comforts Carrie. When she goes to hug Carrie to comfort her, a light bulb over the shower mysteriously pops.

After the incident she is sent home to her mother, who is convinced that her daughter has committed grievous sins. Why else would the “curse of blood” be upon her? Carrie just wants to talk to her mother at a time like this like a normal girl would, but her mother locks her into a closet to pray for forgiveness for her sins. This incident makes Carrie a total pariah at school because by now everyone has seen the video that Chris has taken. As Carrie continues to try and get on with her life she begins to discover that she has an unusual gift, a power. Telekinesis: The ability to move objects with a thought. As Carrie begins to understand her new found ability, her classmate Chris decides to continue her humiliation of Carrie, but that brings with it severely deadly consequences for her and the entire school.

Carrie is Stephen King’s first novel and the first of his works adapted for film. Of course we all know the Brian DePalma move released in 1976. This movie was a horror classic that started the whole teen slasher/bullied nerd getting back at classmates genre. In this day and age where bullying is in the spotlight, this is a story that will still keep resonating. When the original came out, there was no internet, cell phones or YouTube. That element modernizes the conflict adding another level to Carrie’s humiliation. DePalma’s depiction with it’s Hitchcockesque tones is hard to beat, but I think director Kimberly Pierce (Boys Don’t Cry, Stop-Loss, The L Word), hit the nail on the head. In some instances the scenes are almost shot for shot. The tone is one of tension from the very beginning. Even if you’ve never seen the original you get the impending sense that something is about to happen and you are excitedly waiting for it. The performances here are solid. Kick Ass “Hit Girl” Chloe Grace Moretz is awkward and uncomfortable enough in her own skin to pull you into Carrie’s world and she is glorious as she conducts her symphony of destruction, exacting her climatic revenge on all whom she thinks have tormented her. Julianne Moore brings more dimension to the character of Margaret White, Carrie’s mother. With the original we only got a taste of just how twisted Margaret is; with this version we see the depths of her lunacy, and we marvel at the fact that Carrie is still alive. This representation is a little truer to the book so there’s not a total annihilation of the school. My only gripe is that I think the gore factor could have been kicked up just a notch, and the carnage at the gym could have been juicier. But other than that, I think Carrie is definitely worth a look, if only for nostalgia’s sake.

4 OUT OF 5 STARS

Check out the trailer for “CARRIE” below:

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